Who invented the first vibrator

Duration: 8min 37sec Views: 629 Submitted: 05.09.2020
Category: Babysitter
There is a wonderful urban legend that says Egyptian queen Cleopatra ordered her servants to fill a carved out gourd with bees to stimulate her genitals, with the rhythmic buzzing inside the base turning the hollow gourd into a makeshift vibrator. I'm going to go out on a limb here and guess that this legend is probably fake, but it does shed light on a truth we all know: That women have always desired sexual pleasure and sought means to satisfy themselves with a little help from some creative tools. Flash forward to today, when the vibrator is the crux of every woman's sex toy collection; it is her trusty go-to tool. Yet what do we really know about vibrators? How did these things come about, if not for Cleopatra and her insect-gourd?

Vibrator (sex toy)

The buzz: how the vibrator came to be | Sex | The Guardian

Joseph Mortimer Granville 4 May , Devonport — 23 November , London was an English physician, author and inventor known for having first patented the electomechanical vibrator for relief of male muscle aches. Grandville qualified M. He attained the higher medical degree M. In his earlier years he was much engaged in journalism, and was, we believe, a frequent contributor to the editorial columns of the Lancet. He practised at one time in Bristol, but afterwards settled in London, and gave particular attention to the treatment of gout, upon which he wrote largely. In addition to his famous invention of an electric vibrator, he also invented a sphygmograph and a differential thermometer.

Joseph Mortimer Granville

Described by its producers as a Merchant Ivory film with comedy, Hysteria's humour derives chiefly from the surprise of its subject's origins, which are as little known as they are improbable. The vibrator was, in fact, invented by respectable Victorian doctors, who grew tired of bringing female patients to orgasm using their fingers alone, and so dreamt up a device to do the job for them. Their invention was regarded as a reputable medical instrument — no more improper than a stethoscope — but became wildly popular among Victorian and Edwardian gentlewomen, who soon began buying vibrators for themselves. For its early customers, a vibrator was nothing to be embarrassed about — unlike, it's probably safe to assume, many members of the film's contemporary audience, not to mention some of its stars.
Clue is on a mission to help you understand your body, periods, ovulation, and so much more. Start tracking today. But where did they come from? You might have heard the story of how a doctor invented the vibrator as a treatment for hysteria. In her Encyclopedia of Unusual Sex Practices, Brenda Love claimed that Cleopatra BC used a gourd filled with bees to stimulate her genitals, similar to a vibrator 4.